A database is a collection of information that is organized so that it can be easily accessed, managed and updated. Computer databases typically contain aggregations of data records or files, containing information about sales transactions or interactions with specific customers.

In a relational database, digital information about a specific customer is organized into rows, columns and tables which are indexed to make it easier to find relevant information through SQL or NoSQL queries. In contrast, a graph database uses nodes and edges to define relationships between data entries and queries require a special semantic search syntax. As of this writing, SPARQL is the only semantic query language that is approved by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Typically, the database manager provides users with the ability to control read/write access, specify report generation and analyze usage. Some databases offer ACID (atomicity, consistency, isolation and durability) compliance to guarantee that data is consistent and that transactions are complete.
Databases have evolved since their inception in the 1960s, beginning with hierarchical and network databases, through the 1980s with object-oriented databases, and today with SQL and NoSQL databases and cloud databases.

In one view, databases can be classified according to content type: bibliographic, full text, numeric and images. In computing, databases are sometimes classified according to their organizational approach. There are many different kinds of databases, ranging from the most prevalent approach, the relational database, to a distributed database, cloud database, graph database or NoSQL database. See more info at bluesprucemaids.com.